Перейти к содержимому


Фото

MIT admission


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 calmouk

calmouk

    Хан

  • Участник
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1846 Сообщений:

Отправлено 02 June 2008 - 04:32 PM

Для пoступления в Массачусетский Технoлoгический Институте надo всегo лишь прoйти кoнкурс. Все прoшедшие кoнкурс абитуриенты (включая инoстранцев), пoступающие пoсле шкoлы на 1й курс, oбеспечиваются неoбхoдимoй финансoвoй пoддержкoй.

MIT is need-blind for all of applicants and meets the full need of every admitted student
Be Realistic, Demand the Impossible!
(Author: unknown, Paris, 1968)

#2 calmouk

calmouk

    Хан

  • Участник
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1846 Сообщений:

Отправлено 02 June 2008 - 04:37 PM

"Myth #1: "On my Admissions application, I shouldn't say I plan on applying for financial aid""

I have to admit I was inspired by something I saw on Bryan's new blog (for those of you not in the know, Bryan is a new Admissions Officer here at MIT, and also the Director of Minority Recruitment).

In his blog, Bryan talks about whether or not you should list your minority status on your admissions application, and argues strongly that it adds context to your application.

I am going to address a different myth, but somewhat related: the myth that if you say you plan on applying for financial aid on your admissions application you will somehow be viewed differently when considered for Admission.

Unlike minority status (or anything else on your application), financial aid application status is not considered AT ALL when reviewing you for admissions at MIT. Our admissions programs are need-blind.

What exactly does need-blind mean? Need-blind is a shortcut expression which means that no consideration as to ability to pay is used when making the decision whether or not to admit a candidate to the institution.

Is MIT really need-blind for all of its populations? We are, and this sets MIT apart from many of its peers. We are need-blind for every population, domestic, international, transfers, waitlist (if we consider it), early action, etc. In no way does your families finances play any factor in your chances of being admitted.

So why are people reluctant to check that little box on the MIT admissions application that says "I plan on applying for financial aid"? Well, let's look at the state of need-blind admissions around the country and we might see a different picture emerge.

Most colleges around the country say that they are need-blind. While this may be true in the main, saying so doesn't mean that they are need-blind for all application sections (most colleges are not need-blind, for example, when it comes to international admissions).

There is also a perception (mostly wrong) that when it comes to borderline applicants colleges make their admissions decisions in light of who is going to cost them less (in other words, who can afford to pay for their own education). This is also not true.

But every year we see people delay starting their financial aid applications until after the admissions decision is received. A BIG MISTAKE. This causes them unnecessary stress and perhaps a problem with financing as they will not have a financial aid decision in time to make their admissions commitment.

Don't make this mistake!

So, does being need-blind mean that I will get all of the aid I need? At MIT (and, to be fair, at many of our peers) it does. Those institutions that are "full-need" meet the entire calculated need of each applicant with financial aid (in the form of grants/scholarships, loans and/or work awards).

Some colleges, however, practice what I call "merit-aware" financial aid (we are not one of these colleges). At these schools, your admissions status (i.e. how desirable you are to the school) is factored in when you are awarded financial aid. If you are a borderline candidate you may not be awarded a good financial aid package at a school who practices this, while if you are a highly desirable candidate, you may be showered with merit aid, or a great package (no loans, etc). Is this fair? We think not.

At MIT, we award each applicant on the basis of her personal financial circumstance. We are "merit-blind"; we know all of you are exceptional (or else you wouldn't be applying to MIT). Instead the primary criteria for us have everything to do with what you can afford.


Be Realistic, Demand the Impossible!
(Author: unknown, Paris, 1968)

#3 calmouk

calmouk

    Хан

  • Участник
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1846 Сообщений:

Отправлено 02 June 2008 - 04:38 PM

"Myth #2: Merit is better than Need"

It has been a hectic start to the term. With classes starting, working with my freshmen advisees, and just generally solving all of the last minute issues which crop up, it has been a busy couple of weeks.

It is time, however, to return to the theme I began several posts ago: the idea of myth vs. reality. This entry is a bit of an extension of the last one (whether you should list your financial aid status on your application or not) and goes a little farther into the issues around money. The central question I want to consider today is the question of what financial aid is better -- merit-based or need-based.

To begin with, let's define what I mean by both. Merit-based funding is money provided to a student from some source (institutional, state, Federal, private) which is primarily based on the academic, athletic, musical, dramatic, or any other talent of the applicant. Merit money is a reward for past behavior or past accomplishments - a recognition that a student has achieved something and deserves to be rewarded.

Need-based funding is money provided to a student on the basis of the student's need for the funds. In systems using need-based funding, the primary (and one might say only) criterion is whether the student has a difference between their expected cost and their expected ability to pay. If the student does, then she would receive need-based grant.

Now, that's not to say that sometimes the categories don't get muddled. I know some schools practice a "merit-within-need" approach where two students with the same need will get vastly different awards, depending upon their desirability to the school. (I also think that it is very important to say that I do not mean, by this post, to denigrate in any way my colleagues who work at schools who offer merit-based aid. They do great and important work. I just simply am questioning the whole system. I am also not alone in my questioning: you may want to look at a great article on this subject here.)

But I want to focus on the merit vs. need dilemma.

As you are probably aware, MIT (as well as HYP) offers all of its own funding on the basis of need only. Many of our students arrive with some merit-based funding, but it is small (relative to the total cost of an MIT education) and comes from outside sources (more about this in a later post).

Where this issue most clearly plays out is in the many conversations I have with students who have been awarded full-ride scholarships at schools which are their "safeties" and are debating between taking that offer or undertaking a more significant burden at MIT.

For families in the lowest two income brackets, those earning less than $42,000 annually, this decision usually isn't an issue, since MIT's financial aid package will usually be comparable (or larger) than the other institution's.

This issue particularly cuts among middle income families who feel the pressure to pay for college and plan for retirement, and who look at the prospect of a full-ride as a well-deserved recognition of their student's achievement.

So, is merit better than need? It really depends on you. But let me give you a couple of things to think about.

Merit may be better the first year, but is it good for all four years? Some colleges may have particular rules about whether their merit award can be renewed in future years (GPA, living on campus, etc). Pay particular attention to these requirements, since if you fail to meet them chances are you will lose your merit-based scholarship. If you receive need-based aid, the money will only change if your family's financial situation changes dramatically.

Do you want to attend a school where you are the run of the mill or the cream of the crop? Chances are that you want to attend MIT precisely because you are looking for an experience where you can study, live with, and be a part of a culture where you are not the only student like you. For schools like MIT, it is almost impossible to run merit-based programs since we could never determine who is the most meritorious. Our school is filled with students who would qualify. Wouldn't you rather be one of a group of students like you? Schools who offer students merit-based funding often are saying to the student that having them enroll is a "reach" for that school. Would you rather be a "reach" student for the school, or be a student at a "reach" school?

Is merit aid really good for society as a whole? I realize that social justice may not be at the core of everything you do, but I did have to put this one here. Schools have limited resources, and limited financial aid budgets. When a school offers a merit-based scholarship to an applicant, chances are that money is coming out of their need-based financial aid budget.

So is merit aid good for you? The answer to this really depends on you. For some families, merit aid will be too good an opportunity to pass up. But the question is whether merit aid will lead you to your goal: an educational experience without peer.


Be Realistic, Demand the Impossible!
(Author: unknown, Paris, 1968)

#4 calmouk

calmouk

    Хан

  • Участник
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1846 Сообщений:

Отправлено 02 June 2008 - 04:39 PM

"Myth #3: Need-based and full-need mean the same thing"

It's time to tackle another myth. For today, I thought I would address the major difference between need-based and full-need (and then, I promise, I'll leave the need discussion behind for a few posts).

Hopefully in the last several posts, you've gotten to understand what "need-blind" means, and you can state the difference between merit-based aid and need-based aid. One thing we haven't yet had the chance to discuss, though, (in this context) is the definition of full-need.

Many schools in the country can state that they are need-based; all that this means is that all of the money that they award is based on a family's need (measured by the budget less that particular family's ability to pay for college).

Being need-based, however, does not indicate an ability to meet the full-need of every applicant. Only a few schools in the country have the resources to meet the full need of every applicant who is admitted. MIT, thanks to the generosity of its alumni and other generous donors, is one of these institutions.

What does this mean to you? For many institutions, the ability to meet your need in its entirety is limited by their financial aid budget. If the school cannot meet your full need, you will be responsible to afford the remainder of what the school cannot meet as your additional expense.

So, don't confuse full-need with need-blind. They mean very different things.


Be Realistic, Demand the Impossible!
(Author: unknown, Paris, 1968)

#5 calmouk

calmouk

    Хан

  • Участник
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1846 Сообщений:

Отправлено 02 June 2008 - 04:40 PM

"Myth #4: "This financial aid thing is something my mom and dad need to worry about...""

Well, I do hope this post engenders some commentary and discussion. The subtitle of this post could be "Whose financial aid application is it anyway."

I recognize that with an Admissions application, it is pretty clear who is responsible for the application. In most families, parents may be interested in, but usually aren't involved in completing their son's or daughter's applications for admission. Writing the essays, completing the forms, getting the teachers to write recommendations, copying and mailing the application, all of this is usually handled by the student applying (with, granted, some support from parents -- emotionally, logistically and financially).

Since students are so involved in the admissions process, why then do so many of them turn off when it comes to financial aid process? I have spoken to many students who, when asked why a form wasn't filed on time or whether their parents are self-employed, answer "the financial aid application is something my mom/dad is handling".

Well, it isn't that simple folks.

Let's start at the end and work our way backward to see why this is.

An MIT education (or any college education, for that matter) is your education (the "you" here referring to students). We communicate with you, you own your student account, you are the responsible party when it comes to making payment, and your educational records belong to you. Now, granted, we realize that most of you will have parents who will play a significant role (at least financially, but we hope in many other ways) in your college experience, but without your express permission, we are limited in the ways in which we can communicate with them (both by a little law [ed note: it really isn't little] called FERPA [the Federal Educational Right to Privacy Act] and by MIT's own privacy policy).

So what does this mean for you right now?

You need to be involved in the financial aid application process. Know what is due. Know when it is due. Know about our policies and procedures. Keep on reading the blog. Read the letters and emails we send you during the application process, and -- above all -- make sure you are in the loop. Because in the end, your financial aid is just that -- your financial aid.

Students, what is your take on the issue of your own educational record? Are you ready/eager for this academic independence?

Parents, what is your reaction to this? While paying the bills is an absolutely significant part of making education possible for your daughter or son, are you hesitant or eager to give up your daily involvement in the rest of her/his education?


Be Realistic, Demand the Impossible!
(Author: unknown, Paris, 1968)

#6 calmouk

calmouk

    Хан

  • Участник
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1846 Сообщений:

Отправлено 02 June 2008 - 04:41 PM

"Myth #5: "The more I get in scholarships from other places, the less my parents have to pay to MIT.""

Outside scholarships are great. They save students money and help reduce the amount students will owe after graduation. But the one thing they don't do is reduce your contribution to your MIT education.

Why is this? What is the advantage to outside scholarships, then? And how do you find out for which scholarships you might qualify?

Read on, McDuff...

First let's tackle the question of how scholarships are counted. Since MIT meets the full-need of every applicant (with a combination of grants, work and loans), when you receive an outside scholarship there is no place to put the money in your financial aid award.

Pretend that your financial aid award is kind of like a barrel of coins:

Отправленное изображение

When we award you financial aid, our job is to fill up your barrel. The first money we put in the barrel is your contribution; if what you can afford fills up the barrel, then you do not qualify for aid.

Take the above image as an example. If the cost of MIT is $45,000 for a year and we determine that you can afford $45,000 then there is no room in your barrel for any assistance. In the example above, the family has an $8,000 contribution, so that is the first thing to go in the barrel.

The next item we add to the barrel is your self-help. This is the amount that you will earn or borrow to support yourself during the year. For 2005-06, the per student self-help requirement is $5,500 (we'll set next year's number shortly before we mail awards). There will be much more information coming on this later, so no need to worry about it now.

Then, we add need-based scholarship money from MIT to fill the rest of your barrel. In the example we are using above, this family needed $31,500 to fill their barrel, and MIT provides it.

Because we are a full-barrel school (or, rather, a full-need school), what happens if you receive an outside scholarship? Well, we simply can't add the money to the barrel as the barrel would overflow. So we take some money out to make room for your scholarship.

At MIT, we start by removing your self-help first; in other words, we reduce your loan and/or work by the amount of your outside scholarship (you'll tell us which you want us to reduce first). Once this money is completely removed, we next have to reduce your MIT scholarship. The last item we will touch is your contribution.

By the way, this is not just us being stingy; the Federal government has a policy which requires us to consider these funds as resources to you, and therefore they have to reduce your need for funding. Other institutions' policies may or may not be as generous. Make sure to find out if these schools will reduce loans to a point only and then grant and loans by 1/2 each, or whether outside scholarships will go to replace need the college couldn't meet (as they are not a full need school).

So how do you maximize your benefit here? First of all, make sure to apply to outside scholarship providers (I'll point you to some links for scholarship searches in a moment). Now is the time to do this: many scholarship providers have their deadlines in the fall! If you are lucky enough to receive more than $5,500 see if some of the granters will defer payment on the funds until your later years (many programs are Freshmen year only). If you explain that the money will not be used to reduce your loan obligation if it is more than $5,500, most providers will work with you.

So when do you need to start the application process? NOW!!! I would advise that anyone who is interested in looking to other sources for scholarship or grant should be looking on-line now to see if there are any programs with which you match. You can do this for free by creating an account at FastWeb, as well as some other scholarship sites. By entering some basic biographical information, these search engines will try to match you with scholarship programs you may be able to apply for, and provide deadlines and application processes for them. NOW is absolutely the right time to do this. Many of these programs have November or December deadlines, so time is of the essence.

So while scholarship money from other sources may not pay your bill for you, or reduce what your contribution will be, they may help significantly reduce your post-college loan obligation.


Taken from here -> http://www.mitadmiss...rg/Daniel.shtml
Be Realistic, Demand the Impossible!
(Author: unknown, Paris, 1968)

#7 calmouk

calmouk

    Хан

  • Участник
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1846 Сообщений:

Отправлено 02 June 2008 - 05:29 PM

Здесь нескoлькo раз пoднималась идея o сoздании некoегo калмыцкoгo Фoнда.

Чтoбы талантливые и хoрoшo успевающие шкoльники мoгли пoпрoбoвать пoступить в тoт же МИТ, им надo иметь какие тo первoначальные деньги - заплатить за тесты (TOEFL, SAT) , за application/admission fee, за пoчтoвые расхoды... Для мнoгих семей эти расхoды - непoдьемны.

Нужен Фoнд именнo для таких целей. Предпoлoжим, пoмoгать oтличникам в пoступлении в университеты США. На первoначальнoм этапе oсoбеннo. А пoсле удачнoгo пoступления, тoт же МИТ oплатит все - включая авиабилеты из Элисты в Бoстoн.
Be Realistic, Demand the Impossible!
(Author: unknown, Paris, 1968)

#8 PRiKoL1ST

PRiKoL1ST

    Китад

  • Участник
  • Pip
  • 1 Сообщений:

Отправлено 25 March 2009 - 09:18 PM

мм интересно реально ли поступить в магистратуру МИТ-а после МАИ) и получить образовательный кредит в сша?

#9 галдан

галдан

    Цоохор

  • Ööрд
  • PipPipPip
  • 199 Сообщений:
  • Gender:Male

Отправлено 26 March 2009 - 09:03 AM

Здесь нескoлькo раз пoднималась идея o сoздании некoегo калмыцкoгo Фoнда.

Чтoбы талантливые и хoрoшo успевающие шкoльники мoгли пoпрoбoвать пoступить в тoт же МИТ, им надo иметь какие тo первoначальные деньги - заплатить за тесты (TOEFL, SAT) , за application/admission fee, за пoчтoвые расхoды... Для мнoгих семей эти расхoды - непoдьемны.

Нужен Фoнд именнo для таких целей. Предпoлoжим, пoмoгать oтличникам в пoступлении в университеты США. На первoначальнoм этапе oсoбеннo. А пoсле удачнoгo пoступления, тoт же МИТ oплатит все - включая авиабилеты из Элисты в Бoстoн.



А чем они(выпускники МИТ) помогут Калмыкии? Очевидно, они не вернуться подымать науку и интеллектуальный потенциал калмыцкой Родины. Хотя Бостон предпочтителен нацистской Москвы.

#10 sanal

sanal

    Китад

  • Участник
  • Pip
  • 8 Сообщений:

Отправлено 27 March 2009 - 05:05 AM

мм интересно реально ли поступить в магистратуру МИТ-а после МАИ) и получить образовательный кредит в сша?



Almost impossible.




0 пользователей читают эту тему

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users